Hines Prize 2021 Call for Submissions

The Hines Prize is awarded to the best first book-manuscript relating to any aspect of the Carolina Lowcountry and/or the Atlantic World. The prize carries a cash award of $1,000 and preferential consideration by the University of South Carolina Press for the CLAW Program’s book series. If you have a manuscript on a topic pertaining to the Carolina Lowcountry and/or Atlantic World, please send a copy to CLAW Director Sandra Slater slaters@cofc.edu before May 15, 2021. If you have graduate students with potential manuscripts that could contend for the Prize, please make sure that they know of this biennial opportunity.

Lori Glover Lecture Rescheduled

The lecture by Dr. Lorri Glover on her book, Eliza Lucas Pinckney is being rescheduled.  The campus is adamant that no events affiliated with CofC be held this evening because of concerning weather and access to WiFi for students and faculty.  CLAW is working with Lorri to reschedule, so stay tuned.  Thank you for your understanding and please be safe today.

An Interview With Dr. Victoria Barnett-Woods

Book Cover for Cultural Economies of the Atlantic World by Victoria Barnett-Woods.

This past week CLAW Director Sandy Slater interviewed Dr. Victoria Barnett-Woods about her new edited collection, Cultural Economies of the Atlantic World: Objects and Capital in the Transatlantic Imagination (2020). Dr. Victoria Barnett-Woods is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor at Loyola University Maryland. To access this interview please use the following link: https://cofc.zoom.us/rec/share/Rek2Sl5rJD3H

INSTITUTE FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN RESEARCH (IAAR) VIRTUAL SYMPOSIUM

Dear friends,

Please join the IAAR this Friday and Saturday (November 13-14, 2020) as they commemorate 350 years of the Carolina-Barbados connection. The IAAR website has been updated with the titles of the presentations: https://www.sc.edu/study/colleges_schools/artsandsciences/centers_and_institutes/iaar/.

Please see the registration links below for the symposium.

Click Here to Register for Day 1 (Friday, November 13, 2020)

Click Here to Register for Day 2 (Saturday, November 14, 2020)

Interdisciplinary Journal Call for Proposals

Understanding and Dismantling Privilege Journal Special Issue on the theme All Black Lives Matter

“In response to the murder of Breonna Taylor and others, ongoing systemic anti-Black racism and the outpouring of support to disrupt these current inequities, Understanding and Dismantling Privilege seeks to publish a special issue illustrating that not only do Black Lives Matter, but All Black Lives Matter. Students (youth and adult), activists, scholars, educators, and practitioners are invited to submit scholarship, personal reflections, creative pieces, and action-oriented curricular ideas that speak to lived experiences and critically constructed perceptions of All Black Lives. This special issue intends to address the diversity of those who identify as Black and honor additional lived experiences and social identities.”

Works must be submitted by November 1, 2020. For further details please visit: Call for submissions: ALL BLACK LIVES MATTER.

CLAW Partner Virtual Event

Building Justice From the Source

The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor NHA invites you to attend a live, virtual event on Thursday, October 29, at 4PM EST. This virtual event will bring together a group of emerging, traditional artists from across the nation: Jake Blount, Sara Makeba Daise, Marquise Knox and Latanya D. Tigner. They are all deeply rooted in traditional culture and drawing on that powerful wellspring to offer important, contemporary social critiques of race, racial injustice and notions of self-identity. Their work encourages us to shape new narratives around contemporary, cultural identities rooted in traditional ways of knowing, living and making art — yet keenly responsive to our current moment. 

To register for this virtual event please visit: bit.ly/fromthesource

Building Justice From the Source

New CLAW Series Publication

Cover for Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery

Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery

Race, Status, and Identity in the Urban Americas

John Garrison Marks

Prior to the abolition of slavery, thousands of African-descended people in the Americas lived in freedom. Their efforts to navigate daily life and negotiate the boundaries of racial difference challenged the foundations of white authority. Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery examines how these individuals built lives in freedom for themselves and their families in two of the Atlantic World’s most important urban centers: Cartagena, along the Caribbean coast of modern-day Colombia, and Charleston, in the lowcountry of North America’s Atlantic coast.

Built upon research conducted on three continents, this book takes a comparative approach to understanding the contours of black freedom in the Americas. It examines how various paths to freedom, responses to the Haitian Revolution, opportunities to engage in skilled labor, involvement with social institutions, and the role of the church all helped shape the lived experience of free people of color in the Atlantic World.

USC Press review quote for Black Freedom in the Age of Slavery.