Blog

Public Lecture

Posted on January 19, 2011

The Market Preparation of Carolina Rice

Thursday January 27, 2011
6 PM
Avery Research Center, 125 Bull Street
Dr. Richard Porcher, emeritus, The Citadel

Rice was introduced into South Carolina in 1685 and spread to Georgia and North Carolina. The industry ended in 1911. The production of Carolina rice for market reached its zenith in the antebellum period, made possible by the invention of advanced machines for threshing and milling. Richard Porcher will focus on how he and co-author William Robert Judd used artifacts from the field and archives to diagram how these machines were constructed and operated. Four sources of power were used to drive the threshing and milling machines: manual, animal, water and steam. The evolution of each of these power systems will be outlined.

Public Lecture

African Nations & Ethnic Identity in the Mina Coast & in Brazil: An Atlantic Comparative Approach

Thursday January 20, 2011
6 PM
Avery Research Center, 125 Bull Street, Charleston, SC 29401

Dr. Luis Nicolau Pares, a visiting professor from Universidade Federal da Bahia and National Humanities Center Fellow, will present his research on the origin of some African ethnic groups currently living in Brazil and the Americas, and draw similarities in their methods of worship and way of life. Luis Nicolau Parés has a Ph.D. in Afro-Brazilian Religion from the University of London.

Faculty Seminar – Harlan Greene

The Holloways: Legacy of an American Family

Faculty Seminar Series: Harlan Greene, Archivist, Special Collections

Friday, January 21, 2011
3:15 PM
Addlestone Library, Room 227, 205 Calhoun Street

“The Holloways: Legacy of an American Family.” Free people of color have always occupied an intriguing place in Southern and Charleston history. Locally, the Holloway family was one of the most pre-eminent free people of color clans. Although the brick and stone memorials they erected to their family and their class have been destroyed, a fragile paper scrapbook survives. Housed at the Avery Research Center and recently restored, the volume created in the early 20th century not only documents their social, legal, cultural and slave owning activities before the civil war, but dramatically shows how the family’s status declined in the Jim Crow era. The scrapbook, an attempt to shape historical memory, is not only a memorial but a plea sent out to future historians to not erase the Holloways and their class from history, something they saw happening – and which inspired the scrapbook’s creation. Harlan Greene, former Director of Archival and Reference services at Avery, now Senior Manuscript and Reference Archivist at Addlestone Library, will share his observations regarding the scrapbook and the article based on it in a forthcoming in the

Public Lecture

Posted on November 16, 2010

The Slave Body in the World of Southern Medicine

Thursday November 18, 2010
6 PM
Avery Research Center, 125 Bull Street, Charleston, SC 29401

Dr. Stephen Kenny, Lecturer, University of Liverpool, UK will discuss the development of professional medicine in the Old South, especially the role of slave patients and the uses of slave bodies in that process. This lecture is co-sponsored by Avery Research Center, CLAW, and the Waring Historical Library.

Lecture and Book Signing

Posted on November 1, 2010

Gullah Memories Behind God’s Back

Thursday November 4, 2010
7-8 PM
Addlestone Library, 205 Calhoun Street, room 227

Herb Frazier, a freelance writer based in Charleston, is the author of
Gullah Memories Behind God’s Back, which is published by the Evening
Post Publishing Company. The book, a collection of stories from black
and white residents of the Cainhoy, Wando and Huger communities and St.
Thomas and Daniel islands, is a compilation of accounts of the
experiences of Gullah people who struggled after Emancipation, through
the Depression and into the middle of the twentieth century to maintain
their African-based lifestyles in rural communities near Charleston.
This event is co-sponsored by the Addlestone Friends of the Library.

Faculty Seminar Series

Posted on October 15, 2010

Faculty Seminar Series: Dr. Edmund L. Drago

Friday, October 29, 2010
3:15 PM
Addlestone Library, Room 227, 205 Calhoun Street

Dr. Edmund L. Drago, Department of History, College of Charleston, “A View of America’s Civil War Millennial Era through the Perspective of Eliza Fludd, Charleston Prophetess: Gender and Global Implications, 1800-1890.”

View the paper (Do not cite without permission from the author)

Wachovia Lecture

Posted on October 14, 2010

Wachovia Lecture: Dean Hall

Thursday October 14, 2010
7-9 PM
Johnson Center, Room 206, 28 George Street

Associates with Brockington and Associates, a cultural resource management company in Mt. Pleasant, will be giving a public lecture on recent work at Dean Hall Plantation in Berkeley County, South Carolina. Charlie Philips, senior historian, will present the history of Dean Hall Plantation. Andrew Agha, senior archaeologist, will discuss the recent excavations, which uncovered 127,000 artifacts, including 57,000 Colonoware sherds. Nichole Isenbarger, lab supervisor, will discuss the significance of the found artifacts and Colonoware. Analysis of these sherds has helped shed light on the folkways of the enslaved people at Dean Hall plantation.

Crisis and Conflict in the Carolinas

Posted on October 5, 2010

Reminder — October 9-10, 2010

Conference:

Crisis and Conflict in the Carolinas

CLAW will host a symposium on the two Carolinas during the first quarter of the eighteenth century, “Crisis and Conflict in the Early Carolinas,” on October 9-10, 2010. Approximately one dozen scholars will present work on various topics, including the Yamasee War, the Tuscarora War, the Revolution of 1719, the slave trade, the plantation economy, and piracy. For more information, contact conference conveners Brad Wood of Eastern Kentucky University, Michelle LeMaster of Lehigh University, or local organizer Sandy Slater of the College of Charleston.

Conference Schedule
Conference Registration

Lecture and Book Signing

Posted on September 24, 2010

Lowcountry Time and Tide: The Fall of the South Carolina Rice Kingdom

Thursday September 30, 2010
7-9 PM
Avery Research Center, 125 Bull Street

James H. Tuten, a lowcountry native and College of Charleston graduate, opens this study with an overview of the history of rice culture in South Carolina through the Reconstruction era and then focuses on the industry’s manifestations and decline from 1877 to 1930. Tuten offers a close study of changes in agricultural techniques and tools during the period and demonstrates how adaptive and progressive rice planters became despite their conservative reputations. He also explores the cultural history of rice both as a foodway and a symbol of wealth in the lowcountry, used on currency and bedposts. Tuten concludes with a thorough treatment of the lasting legacy of rice culture, especially in terms of the environment, the continuation of rice foodways and iconography, and the role of rice and rice plantations in the modern tourism industry.